Tag Archive for hudson river

Quiet gray river

 

Quiet gray river

Two ferries too far to hear

Raise frothy white wakes

 

Brant geese flock swims by

Stops to breakfast at seawall

Gull swoops down to watch

 

Joggers’ bright shirts glow

Red, blue, yellow, acid green

In foggy morning

 

Snow day

Windy, heavy snow and sleet when I was out this morning, but blizzard? Nah. Still, almost no one down by the river but me. One other photographer, two joggers, and one dogwalker: the big tattooed guy with the four little dachsunds. This is their foot/paw prints in the snow.

 

And this is the dogwalker with the dogs and the jogger. These are all 8:00 a.m. photos, by the way.

 

Water taxi dock.

 

Pier 46 pilaster.

 

Blue light with snow hat.

 

Curving pathway.

 

 

And the river still flows

Lots of action on the river this morning. A pair of Canada geese swam south; a pair of Brant geese swam south a few minutes later, then turned around and swam north. I wondered why until I saw, about twenty feet behind them, the Canada geese also swimming north — that is, escorting the Brants out of Canada goose territory. A cormorant flew low over the water and dropped into the area at the end of the piling field where a male bufflehead was already fishing. A male red-breasted merganser popped up from his underwater fishing grounds. I saw the female yesterday. He must have been finished with his breakfast because he swam a ways out, groomed his feathers, and stuck his head under his wing for a nap. A pair of mallards glided in for a landing on the pilings. Then the male Canada goose set up a major squawking fest, as another pair of Canada geese swooped overhead, but lifted again and didn’t land. Mid-February, Canada goose mating season. This land may be your land, but this stretch of the river is mine all mine!

Red-breasted merganser photo not mine; it’s from allaboutbirds.org. I thought this post needed a visual, and he’s so cute.

Rain in the snow haiku

Green swells roll slowly,

Lap up seawall, slide away,

Dotted with raindrops.

 

Gulls circle, swoop, land.

Cormorant pops up with fish.

Starlings fly above.

 

Blue lights on railing.

Snow on branches, walkway, grass.

Red life preserver.

 

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The return of the haiku

The haiku have been on hiatus (no, I couldn’t resist that line, would you have?) but now that we’re in for a long, dark time, I feel the need to write them again. So they’re back, now with photos.

Bright windless morning
Gulls cry, loud in the quiet
Sun glints on ripples

Hawk slides across moon
Circles up on rising drafts
A black speck, then gone

Patrol boat churns past
White wake rises, fades again
Glassy water shines

 

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Nineteenth Saturday

Across the river
Streetlamps glow into gray day.
Single red light blinks.

Ferry churns thick wake
Passing before sharp white tents
Against green hillside.

Water laps seawall.
Runners’ feet slap stone pathway.
Fog melts towers’ tops.

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Sixteenth Saturday, two days late

Brant geese at pilings
Fattening for the trip north
Speed-eating that moss.

Sharp contrail in sky
Cuts across thin smudgy clouds —
Chalk line on blackboard.

Construction cranes still
Scattered on far shore’s skyline
At resting angles.

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Thirteenth Saturday

Seagull circles, lands,
Pecks at food scrap, changes mind,
Floats on rippling waves.

Second gull soars in,
Tries same scrap. Same opinion.
Bobs beside his bud.

Big blackback swoops down.
Others lift off, flap away.
Empty kingdom’s his.

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Twelfth Saturday

Pearl water reflects
Red rim surrounding far clock,
Palest blue of sky.

Looking for breakfast
Geese zig-zag through piling field.
Slow-motion pinball.

In sunlight spotlight
Tanker powers upriver.
Two white gulls follow.

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River report

Still chilly here, but you can’t fool a duck. Two male buffleheads chasing each other around, feeling the start of mating season. Buffleheads fly back to the Arctic to nest and raise chicks, but they start the process down here. Not a female in sight, but still, after they finished arguing over fishing rights (which argument included the losing duck diving, twice, and the winning one diving to chase him up from underwater) and the loser flew away, the winner did the dip-the-head-and-preen thing they show off with. Nobody around to be impressed with him but me.

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Not a great photo, but: Da Winnah!

A little later, four red-breasted mergansers paddled by, with their seagull escort. The gulls don’t like the ducks — the gulls don’t like anybody, really — but they often hang around the diving ones because they bring up fish and occasionally drop them. The male mergansers were both showing off for the same female, while the other female just swam on, probably wondering when she’d become chopped liver.

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Small flock

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Showing off

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Seagull escort